Shabbat: A Symbol of Our Hope for a Better World

The Mishnah tells us that: On Shabbat, the Levites in the ancient Temple would sing: “Mizmor shir l’yom HaShabbat – A psalm, a song for Shabbat day” (Psalm 92). This is to be understood as being a psalm, a song for the future – for the day that will be nothing but Shabbat and restContinue reading “Shabbat: A Symbol of Our Hope for a Better World”

Why I Walk to Shul: Shabbat As Mindfulness

It’s raining outside today, which has me thinking about an old joke: Q: What does a bear do when it rains? A: It gets wet. Let’s contrast that to what I do when it rains: First, I check the weather with Siri to see exactly what time it will be raining and for how long.Continue reading “Why I Walk to Shul: Shabbat As Mindfulness”

Between Holy and Ordinary (or “Why I Turn Off My Work Email on Shabbat”)

Once we were slaves. Now we are free. Shabbat is Zecher Liy’tziyat Mitzrayim – a reminder of our Exodus from slavery. On Shabbat, we are meant to embrace freedom, to throw off the shackles of the things that enslave us. As a Reform Jew, I take seriously the mitzvah of Shamor et Yom Hashabbat –Continue reading “Between Holy and Ordinary (or “Why I Turn Off My Work Email on Shabbat”)”

The Life That We Would Like to be Living: A Sermon for Rosh Hashanah 5773

The Architect Frank Lloyd Wright tells about a memory. He was nine years old, and he was walking across a snowy field with his no-nonsense uncle. The boy wandered this way and that, collecting reeds and taking in the scenery, while his uncle walked straight across the field. Upon reaching the top of the hill,Continue reading “The Life That We Would Like to be Living: A Sermon for Rosh Hashanah 5773”